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The 'death' of faith may be exaggerated; believers still outnumber those who don't

JuDea Klaas, Christine Matte and Brian Sanchez are at different stages of their lives and thousands of miles normally separate them, but they share something each would say is crucial to his or her life: faith in God.

October 07, 2015 | Lois M. Collins Deseret News | Other Views


It's time for candidates to make simplification of tax code an issue

In 2008, Timothy Geithner was nominated for U.S. secretary of the Treasury. He was voted in by the U.S. Senate, and served from 2009 to 2013 under President Barack Obama. It was later discovered that, even as a trained economist and monetary expert, he had underpaid his taxes in the previous decade by $34,000. This is a man who studied at both Dartmouth College and Johns Hopkins University, yet the mistakes in his tax forms were attributable to his own misunderstandings about his tax status.

October 06, 2015 | John Hoffmire Deseret News | Other Views


Employee ownership — an idea many agree with, few know

The philosophy behind an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) has three parts, according to ESOP advisors: broaden ownership of capital, create financial security and incentives, and urge better employee productivity. It is a wonder that ESOPs are not more prevalent with such a philosophy.

September 29, 2015 | John Hoffmire Deseret News | Other Views


Making toilets 'cool' needs to be major health priority in India

For hundreds of millions of people in rural India, living life without a toilet used to be quite common. However, thanks to the Indian government’s toilet building program, millions of people now have regular access to toilets for the first time. Although this sounds like a tremendous success, there’s still one more thing to be done: convince people to use them.

September 22, 2015 | John Hoffmire Deseret News | Other Views


The amazing power of kindness

While trying to wedge my folding canvas chair into an already full line of spectators at my grandson’s soccer game recently, a young mother next to me kept adjusting her own chair to make sure I got a comfortable place. Her concern was more than perfunctory. In the next few minutes, I observed her tender kindness and affectionate gestures as she interacted with her husband and children. The special feeling her example left me with has endured for weeks.

September 18, 2015 | Greg Bell Deseret News | Other Views


To the man who yelled at me: I'm sorry

I came across a post on Facebook the other day that struck a chord with me:

September 18, 2015 | Carmen Rasmusen Herbert Deseret News | Other Views


Our personal experiences as acts of philosophy, politics and economics

As new school and work years begin, it is a perfect time to analyze what we do and, if necessary, make some changes. I am probably the first who needs to amend what I do. Primary among the priorities I want to adjust is related to how my actions can be consistent with my professed philosophy as well as my political and economic beliefs.

September 16, 2015 | John Hoffmire Deseret News | Other Views


Do we like heroes or gossip better? And what does it say about us?

While trying to figure out what to feature on their Sept. 7 cover, People magazine editors had a dilemma that feels both surreal and strangely modern America. I think it’s worth pondering.

September 14, 2015 | Lois M. Collins Deseret News | Other Views


Education about alternative energy options remains pressing need

Today the world consumes over 12,700 Mtoe (million of tons of oil or equivalent) or 1.47 E12 terawatt hours of energy. The majority of that energy consumption (92 percent) comes in the form of fossil fuels such as coal, oil or natural gas. However, these sources of energy are finite and are fast being exhausted.

September 09, 2015 | John Hoffmire Deseret News | Other Views


Transforming noble ideas into novel solutions

The beacon of development often conjures up images of radical innovations, disruptive models and leapfrog technologies. And yet, as nations attempt to embrace the promises of development, there is often a colossal failure of both imagination and execution in providing for even the most basic of human needs. Measurable social change, ensuring a degree of social equity and fundamental provisions, is critical in securing any significant socio-economic transformation. Pervasive deprivations and glaring inequities create a corrosive burden on our societies — violating our sensibilities and fomenting adversity.

September 06, 2015 | John Hoffmire Deseret News | Other Views


Cash transfers are one way to alleviate poverty in developing countries

Worldwide, over 1 billion people live in extreme poverty. That is, they make less than $1.25 a day. Moreover, until recently, about 3 billion people, who represented about half the world population, lived on less than $2.50 a day. These World Bank figures speak volumes about how big the poverty problem is. The size of the problem helps us understand why governments, NGOs and even some companies are looking for a way to address this issue.

September 06, 2015 | John Hoffmire Deseret News | Other Views


Climate change presents skewed vulnerabilities and the ethical imperative

The discourse around climate change is often spiced by vested interests, denial, skepticism, exaggeration and inertia. Even in rare constructive moments, the discussions are primarily limited to factual and technical analysis. This overriding focus on supposedly "objective" parameters only serves to blunt the effectiveness of our responses.

September 01, 2015 | John Hoffmire Deseret News | Other Views


Helping teens write new chapter after a mistake

At 16, school was not nearly as important to him as it should have been. Not quite a man, but no longer a boy, he was focused more on some challenges his family faced and on his social life. He figured he’d better get a job.

August 30, 2015 | Lois M. Collins Deseret News | Other Views


Moral deficits in donations: a case for anonymous giving

Anonymous giving is something we rarely talk about. Some might argue the nature of the topic makes it elusive; it is intrinsically invisible. Another reason we skirt around the topic is because some would prefer to not give anonymously, and to point it out is awkward.

August 25, 2015 | John Hoffmire Deseret News | Other Views


Winning war on poverty demands shifting focus to fighting unemployment

In 1964, then-President Lyndon B. Johnson declared war. Not a foreign war to be waged against another country fought with soldiers, tanks and bombs, but a war to be waged at home.

August 20, 2015 | John Hoffmire Deseret News | Other Views


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